Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Fast backward of the old, and the new passageway we must construct

In Germany, they are working on a potentially breakthrough technology using heat from lamps that, when concentrated in one spot, reach temperatures of 3,500 Celsius, or what this article calls "the world's largest artificial sun," and then to use this heat to create hydrogen fuel for energy.

Meanwhile, in France, a huge project is underway, called International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), to develop nuclear fusion as a source of unlimited clean energy for the future. What they are attempting is to find a way to control atomic reactions and harness them for energy. International partners include the U.S., Russia, and China, an initiative first negotiated by Pres. Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev - yes, that long ago. It is still unproven and it may never work, but it is cutting edge technology in any case. Also hugely expensive.

In China, the government is moving toward huge wind farms and solar arrays, aware that choking on coal in cities where breathing is deadly does not bode well for the nation's economic future.

MTR coal-mining - Vivian Stockman
Meanwhile, in the Trump White House, they are trying to revive the coal industry.

Talk about dinosaurs. That's what I see every time I look at a room full of white men standing ceremoniously around the fearless (also corrupt and incompetent) leader as he signs some other document intended to harm humans and the planet out of motivations of revenge and resentment. I see dinosaurs. I see remnants of a species after the asteroid has hit, and the fast-rolling responses of a planet's climate systems as the living beings of an old era slowly succumb, disappear, left to future generations only as fossil imprints buried under layers of new eras of the evolution of life.

This new era - already emergent. But not in the giant fusion experiment. That feels a lot like geoengineering - throwing even bigger industrial projects at the planet to try to salvage an aging industrial civilization. Rather, this new era is emergent in the resilient communities rising up all around the planet, reconnecting with the Earth's living systems instead of trying to "harness" them, raising food and new small industries to support neighborhoods and cultures, cleaning up the contamination that marks the character of the old economic model, developing "sharing economies" and eschewing "industrial grandiosity" for the sake of simpler, richer, more tender and loving lives.

Photo: M Swedish
One era is dying, has entered its thrilling and destructive last death throes. The other is creating paths to get us through this difficult passageway to the new evolutionary era, and to the new humans we still might become if given time to heal from the damage this industrial age has done to us. And I ask which road we would rather all be on? And what can we do with our lives to be decisive about the direction we choose?

This poignant article from the NY Times: Hope Springs Early, but Not Eternal, for the Deadnettle - or for Us. While I appreciate the gorgeous writing, poetry, and art emerging from this tragic time of ecological demise, how many more more deeply touching lamentations and expressions of deep grief and fear must we read before they tip the balance away from our collective cultural embrace of industrial society?

So, before cheering on an example of breathtaking arrogant human grandiosity like ITER, which, even if it worked, would come too late and require enormous amounts of mostly mined resources to pull off, can we begin to imagine the simple, the scaled-down, the reduction in energy use rather than finding bigger and better ways to produce more of it? Do we get so focused on reducing CO2 emissions at the point of emitting them, and miss the depletion and destruction of living systems required to address that one end-stage piece of our planetary crisis?

I read this morning (March 28) that Energy Partners is beginning to put oil into the Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota this week. I also read that Bold Louisiana has pledged to put their bodies on the line to stop completion of that pipeline in their state. I also read that the legislature in Maryland has voted to ban fracking in that state, the third to do so. Trump has granted the presidential permit for construction of TransCanada's Keystone XL pipeline. Bold Nebraska is prepared to go back to court over issues of eminent domain in order to try yet again to stop it.

Alice's Garden - M Swedish
In Milwaukee, we gear up at Alice's Garden for the next growing season at what we consider our sacred inner city urban farm, April being the month when our labor gets serious. The Garden is part of a growing new food "economy" here in Milwaukee where urban farming combined with neighborhood markets and skills development in growing businesses related to that economy is taking root - by the sheer will and determination of people in some of our most challenged neighborhoods.

Hope comes from there. Hope comes from all those engaged in one way or another in opening that passageway from an old destructive way of life to the new one emergent everywhere.

That asteroid hit our planet decades ago, when our industrial/consumer economy drove us past the tipping point, beyond the carrying capacity of Mother Earth. That was back in the 1980s. We have been tearing at the threads that hold the web of life together for a long time now. It has shown its resilience to abuse for a long time. But it cannot hold together much longer. Indeed, the signs of the unraveling are already with us. That deadnettle - that deadnettle is announcing the times.

Photo: M Swedish
Some people are listening. Some people are taking action. Some people are dreaming new cultures and new ways of life and actually birthing them. We don't give up. We know we are seeing the death throes of a dying civilization. We know we are about the work of new creation. We are working to open that narrow passageway.

~ Margaret Swedish



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